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ASSIGNMENT TWO

ASSIGNMENT 2A
OBJECT TAXONOMIES

"Exercise 2A will introduce students to basic 3D geometry creation in Rhino. Most geometry in Rhino is created using precise 2D input information (lines, curves). After having gained control of 2D workflows in Part 1 of the course, we will now look to leveraging 2D skills to produce 3D geometry. Specifically, we will look at extruding, lofting, sweeping, revolving, and booleaning to produce taxonomies of objects. The intent in creating a taxonomy is to maximize variety and permuta- tion in 3D forms."

Completed: Spring 2021

Professor: Joel Kerner

ASSIGNMENT 2B
3D GEOMETRIC LOGIC

"After experimenting with the creation of 3D Objects in EX 2A, we will now discuss 3D geometric logic and documentation. Just as EX 1C introduced geometric logic to describe 2D shapes, this exercise will now introduce geometric logic to describe 3D objects. Not only are we interested in describing the geometry of the final object, but also its sequential construction logic - what steps were taken sequentially to produce the resulting object? Could another designer recreate your object from studying your procedural drawings? You could think of this as creating an Ikea-style instruction guide for the creation of your objects in Rhino. Our aim is to dissect the creation of one object from the object taxonomies pro- duced last week. You will describe the steps and techniques used to create the object, while visually representing these steps in PLAN view, ELEVATION view, and AXON view."

Completed: Spring 2021

Professor: Joel Kerner

ASSIGNMENT 2C
ANALYTICAL DRAWINGS

"Building upon the geometric logic explored in EX 2B, Ex 2C will delve further into the topic of analytical drawings by familiarizing students with developable surfaces, serial sectioning, and kit-of-parts drawings. These are just three examples of potential analytical drawing types. As in EX 2B, the intent of these drawings is to communicate the three di- mensional constructive logic of an object or building. These methods of analytical drawing are not unique to architecture, and overlap with fields of medicine, geography, fashion design, among others."

Completed: Spring 2021

Professor: Joel Kerner

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