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ASSIGNMENT ONE

ASSIGNMENT 1A
GRAPHIC FIELDS

"The first assignment will introduce figures, field conditions, and the manipulation of 2D elements in 3D space within rhino. We will use a variety of techniques to produce complexly layered “graphic field” drawings. Through the production of these drawings, students will grow their digital literacy while also developing their unique graphic sensibilities. The drawings are not meant to be legible or communicative, but instead aim to be valued by their qualitative aesthetics alone."

Completed: Spring 2021

Professor: Joel Kerner

ASSIGNMENT 1B
FIGURES AND NETWORKS

"The second assignment will build upon the skills of EX 1A by creating multiple readings of a single graphic field drawing. Lines demarcate thresholds or transitions, and because of their simplicity, could lead to ambiguous readings. A line could represent a change in geometry, a change in material, adjoining volumes, volumes separated by a void, etc. We will be taking abstract lines (created through the graphic field techniques of EX 1A) and interpreting them as either walls, thickened networks (like a web or skeleton), or the boundary between separate volumetric masses (i.e. streets of an urban grid separating buildings). By using a graphic field drawing as a starting point, we will speculate on new methods of interior organization."

Completed: Spring 2021

Professor: Joel Kerner

ASSIGNMENT 1C
2D GEOMETRIC LOGIC

"The third assignment will build upon the skills of EX 1A and EX 1B by introducing geometric control. After experimenting with the creation of 2D figures and shapes in EX 1A and EX 1B, we will now discuss geometric logic and documentation. In design, no matter how loose or abstract a composition may appear, it must always be able to be rationalized and doc- umented through clear geometric logic. This applies to architecture as well as other design disciplines, such as typography and product design. We will use primitive shapes and letters of the alphabet as geometric drivers for this exercise."

Completed: Spring 2021

Professor: Joel Kerner

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